DIY laundry soap

DIY Natural Aromatherapy Laundry Soap

Making your own laundry soap is easier than you think, and it smells heavenly when scented with lavender or citrus essential oils. Our recipe will give you enough for 65 to 95 loads of great-smelling laundry.

  • 4½ cups or 2 lbs of borax (such as 20 Mule Team Borax)
  • 4½ cups or 2 lbs of washing soda (such as Arm & Hammer Washing Soda)
  • 2 shaved-down bars of Dr. Bronner’s Pure-Castile Soap (choose citrus or lavender, depending on the scent you desire)
  • 10 drops of pure lavender or citrus essential oil

Powdered Laundry Soap:

  1. Place all ingredients in a large airtight container with an easy-open lid.
  2. Make sure to mix the ingredients well so that they are all evenly distributed.

Liquid Laundry Soap:

  1. If you want to make the detergent a liquid form, use the same recipe but add the shaved castile soap to about 6 cups of water and boil until fully dissolved.
  2. Remove from stove and add in the rest of the ingredients and stir together until fully blended.
  3. Let sit for about 10 hours or more, allowing it to thicken. This is a concentrated form, so you only need 2 ounces per medium load. This makes low suds, which means it’s good for both regular and HE washers.

Both recipes yield just over 85 ounces of detergent or between 65 and 95 loads, depending on how much is used per load.


  • Mary Bacon

    What exactly is “washing soda” and where can I find this?

    • susan

      It looks just like the arm and hammer baking soda box but says super washing soda found in laundry isle and a big box

    • pancheetah

      Google it

    • Sarah

      Mary, washing soda is sodium carbonate – similar to baking soda but not the same. Its a salt compound. Its used as a natural water softener which helps make your soaps and detergents work better. You can get it at almost any grocery store.

  • Susan

    It looks just like the arm and hammer baking soda box but says super washing soda found in laundry isle

  • Susie

    Borax is not good. Use Borax Substitute (Sodium Sesquicarbonate).

    • Sarah

      Are you thinking of Boric Acid? Boric Acid is not good, but that’s different than Borax. Borax is wholly natural. It doesn’t cause cancer, accumulate in the body, or absorb through the skin. It is not harmful to the environment – its a mineral. Granted, too much of anything can be bad, just like salt or sodium carbonate (which Borax is listed with in terms of toxicity levels). It could make you sick if you ingest a lot. So don’t eat the laundry soap!! Not sure if Sodium Sesquicarbonate will have the same power at clothes washing since its just a combination of baking soda and washing soda – won’t create the same effect as Borax. Has anyone had success in using it?

  • NaturalVitalityLiving

    Thanks for the comments and questions from everyone! We hope you enjoy the laundry soap, whether you use Borax or a substitute. Let us know if you have trouble finding the ingredients – everything should be available at your local market!